World’s Most Sought-After Gems: Natural Fancy Color Pink Diamonds

The pink diamond has often been called “The Queen of Diamonds.”

 

For centuries its rare and regal beauty has been coveted by royalty for crown jewels and museum-worthy collections. The famed Dary-I-Noor pink diamond, for instance, is part of the Iranian Crown Jewels collection. The Condé Pink diamond, which once belonged to Louis XIII, now resides in the Château de Chantilly. And the Williamson Pink diamond, gifted to Queen Elizabeth in 1947, is to this day one of the monarch’s favorite jewels.

 

In 1958, American jeweler Harry Winston set the magnificent 60-carat Nurul Ain pink diamond in Empress Farah’s wedding tiara.

 

London’s Laurence Graff purchased all the stones in the first Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender (1984) to create a brooch for his client, the Sultan of Brunei. And in 2002, Hollywood royal Jennifer Lopez received a 6-carat engagement ring from Ben Affleck, setting off a new wave of pink diamond demand.

Today, many expert diamantaires and jewelry historians consider the natural color pink diamond — The Queen of Diamonds — to be the most sought-after gem of modern times. Let’s take a look at some extraordinary examples.

The Williamson Pink

Canadian geologist Dr. John Williamson presented Princess Elizabeth a stunning 23.6-carat pink diamond on the occasion of her 1947 engagement to Prince Philip. The diamond was later set by Cartier into a floral brooch which Queen Elizabeth II has loved and worn ever since.

 

Fans of the Netflix series “The Crown” will be intrigued by jewelry authority Marion Fasel’s account of The Williamson Pink… and how the wrong brooch was used in an otherwise historically accurate production.

The Pink Star / The Pink Dream

A decade after Bennifer’s pink diamond engagement ring, the popularity of pink diamonds rose to new heights. In November 2013, the 59.6-carat Pink Star, formerly the Steinmetz Pink, came up for auction at Sotheby’s in Geneva. The winning bid of $83 million belonged to New York diamond cutter Isaac Wolf, who renamed the diamond The Pink Dream.

Unfortunately Wolf defaulted on the sale, creating a scandal for the esteemed auction house. But in April 2017, Sotheby’s again auctioned the Pink Star, this time in Hong Kong. It was bought by Chow Tai Fook Enterprises for a record of $71.2 million (the 2013 Pink Dream name and record had not stood).

The Sweet Josephine

Prior to Sotheby’s 2017 Pink Star sale, the record price paid for a pink diamond was held by a 16.08-carat pink which was sold by Christie’s to Hong Kong billionaire Joseph Lau, in 2015, for $28.5 million. Lau purchased the pink diamond as a gift for his daughter Josephine, seven years old at the time, and renamed it The Sweet Josephine.

Argyle Pink Diamonds

No discussion of the world’s most notable pink diamonds can take place without mention of Argyle Pink diamonds from the legendary Argyle diamond mine in Western Australia. Each year, some of the finest pink, red, and violet diamonds ever discovered make their way to the exclusive Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender, an invitation-only private sale. Here are three extraordinary examples:

The Argyle Siren

This Argyle Pink signature diamond is a 1.32-carat square radiant- cut Fancy Vivid Purplish Pink diamond. In almost three decades of the Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender, the Argyle Siren is the largest of three diamonds of the same color, unprecedented size and clarity ever offered for sale.

The Argyle Phoenix

In 2013, this 1.56-carat round brilliant-cut Fancy Red diamond achieved the highest price per carat of any stone ever produced from the Argyle Diamond mine (the actual figure is confidential).

The Majestic Pink Bracelet

The Majestic Pink bracelet is an extraordinary jewel—a once-in-a-lifetime collection of the world’s rarest pink diamonds from the famous Argyle mine. The bracelet features 204 radiant- and marquise-shaped diamonds from Pink to Purplish Pink to Red. These Argyle Pink diamonds weigh a total of 43.34 carats and are bordered by two lines of similarly-cut near-colorless diamonds.

Beyond Rare™

Natural pink diamonds owe much of their enduring allure to their incredible rarity; they account for an infinitesimally small percentage of all diamonds mined. And soon pink diamonds will be rarer still. The Argyle Diamond mine, which produces over 90 percent of the world’s pink diamonds, is set to cease production in late 2020.

This year, only 64 Beyond Rare™ Argyle Pink diamonds were offered at the 2019 Argyle Pink Diamonds Signature Tender, an invitation-only event for diamantaires, connoisseurs and collectors. One of them could be waiting for you at The Gold Center in Naples, Florida. please contact Brian Denney. FGA, GG, at (217) 370-5795 for a private appointment.

Source: https://argylepinkdiamonds.com.au/